Alzheimer's Foundation of America
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | February 2, 2012

Alzheimer’s Foundation of America Applauds Introduction of Bill to Advance Promising Therapies for Costly Chronic Diseases

NEW YORK, NYEric J. Hall, president and chief executive officer of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA), today released this statement related to the introduction in Congress of the bipartisan Spending Reductions through Innovations in Therapies (SPRINT) Agenda Act of 2012:

“The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) proudly supports the Spending Reductions through Innovations in Therapies (SPRINT) Agenda Act of 2012 and applauds the bill’s sponsors, Representatives Christopher Smith and Edward Markey, and Senators Barbara Mikulski and Susan Collins, for recognizing the dire need to expedite the discovery of promising, effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and other costly chronic illnesses.

“The rising incidence of Alzheimer’s disease coupled with the overwhelming financial and emotional toll on American families and recent government statistics showing that the death rate from Alzheimer’s disease continues to climb underscore the aggressiveness with which we must attack this brain disorder.

“The SPRINT Act recognizes this urgency by intensifying the government's commitment to goal-oriented, milestone-driven research initiatives and to accelerate the development of potential therapies in the drug discovery pipeline that will treat Alzheimer’s disease or effectively slow its progression. These efforts offer the promise of reduced healthcare costs to government and society, and, moreover, improved quality of life for Americans with chronic diseases and their caregivers.

“As a member of the Advisory Council on Research, Care and Services advising on the creation of an historic national Alzheimer’s plan as mandated by the National Alzheimer’s Project Act (NAPA), I am excited that the SPRINT Act aligns with the spirit of NAPA. Innovative public/private partnerships, streamlining the Food and Drug Administration review of therapies, and investing in high-risk/high-reward research, as articulated in the SPRINT Act, will be essential to meet this ambitious goal set forth in NAPA’s draft framework to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer’s disease by 2025.

“Now is the time to push the SPRINT Act forward. Now is the time to capture the momentum gripping our nation and offer long-awaited hope to current and future generations.”

The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, based in New York, is a leading national non-profit organization that unites more than 1,600 member organizations nationwide with the goal of providing optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. Its services include counseling and resource/referrals by licensed social workers via a toll-free hot line, SKYPE, live chat and e-mail, as well as educational materials, a free quarterly magazine for caregivers and professional training. For more information about AFA, call toll-free 866-AFA-8484 or visit www.alzfdn.org.

Contact: Carol Steinberg
Phone: 866-AFA-8484